Boost Your Houseplants’ Growth with Copper: The Science-Backed Benefits

Ashley

Copper is an essential micronutrient that is required for plant growth and development. It plays important roles in various physiological processes, including photosynthesis, respiration, and enzyme synthesis. Copper is also involved in the synthesis of lignin, which is a structural component of plant cell walls, and it helps to improve the strength and stability of plants.

If you are new to this blog my name is Ashley and I am a soil scientist. I am located in a Canadian Zone 3 and a USDA Zone 4. I write articles, make YouTube videos, Instagram & Facebook posts all designed for Canadians and Cold Climate gardeners using science-based methods. If you are looking for anything specific be sure to let me know in the comments down below.

What Science Says About Copper For Plants

There are several published scientific studies that support the use of supplemental copper on houseplants. One study published in the journal Plant, Soil, and Environment found that applying copper to plants improved their growth and development. The study found that copper increased the number of leaves, stem length, and root length in plants.

Another study published in the journal Plant Growth Regulation found that applying copper to plants improved their resistance to diseases caused by fungi and bacteria. The study found that copper reduced the incidence of diseases such as powdery mildew and black spot in plants.

How To Apply Copper To Your Houseplant Collection

The best way to apply copper to a plant is to use a copper-based fertilizer or a copper spray. Copper fertilizers are available in various forms, including liquid, granular, and soluble powder. Copper sprays can be made by mixing a small amount of copper sulfate or a copper-based fungicide with water. This form of spray application is what we call a foliar application.

When applying copper to a plant, it is important to follow the instructions on the fertilizer or spray label carefully. Overuse of copper can be toxic to plants, so it is important to use the recommended dosage and frequency of application.

In general, it is recommended to apply copper to houseplants every 2-4 weeks, depending on the plant’s needs and the type of fertilizer or spray being used. It is also important to monitor the plant’s growth and development and adjust the frequency of application accordingly.

There are two things to look at for the application:

  1. Use a copper-based fertilizer or copper spray to apply copper to houseplants.
  2. Follow the instructions on the fertilizer or spray label carefully to avoid overuse, which can be toxic to plants.
  3. Apply copper to houseplants every 2-4 weeks, depending on the plant’s needs and the type of fertilizer or spray being used.
  4. Monitor the plant’s growth and development, and adjust the frequency of application accordingly.
  5. Be cautious when applying copper to plants, as some plants are sensitive to this micronutrient and can be damaged or killed by excessive amounts.
  6. Consult with a horticulturist or gardening expert if you are unsure whether a particular plant is tolerant of copper.

While copper is an essential micronutrient that is required for plant growth and development, it is important to note that not all plants are tolerant of copper. Some plants are sensitive to copper and can be damaged or killed if they are exposed to high levels of this micronutrient.

Here is a list of some plants that should never be treated with copper:

  1. Acacia: This popular landscaping plant is sensitive to copper and can be damaged or killed by excessive amounts of the micronutrient.
  2. Azaleas: These flowering shrubs are also sensitive to copper and can be damaged by high levels of the micronutrient.
  3. Camellias: Camellias are another type of flowering shrub that is sensitive to copper and can be damaged by excessive amounts of the micronutrient.
  4. Gardenias: These popular flowering shrubs are also sensitive to copper and can be damaged by high levels of the micronutrient.
  5. Rhododendrons: These popular landscaping shrubs are sensitive to copper and can be damaged by high levels of the micronutrient.

It is important to note that this is not an exhaustive list, and there may be other plants that are sensitive to copper. If you are unsure whether a particular plant is tolerant of copper, it is best to consult with a horticulturist or a gardening expert.

Summary

In summary, copper is an essential micronutrient that is required for plant growth and development. There is evidence from published scientific studies that supplemental copper can improve the growth and development of houseplants, as well as their resistance to diseases. The best way to apply copper to a plant is to use a copper-based fertilizer or a copper spray, following the instructions on the label carefully and adjusting the frequency of application as needed.

Copper fertilizer for rapid growth in houseplants
Copper fertilizer for rapid growth in houseplants